Richard Syrop Saving money as a passion

Please encourage your friends to tune in to WGTK 970 am. Also, encourage them to CALL!  the live chat line is (502) 571-0970. The show airs from 8:06 to 10pm Eastern Time. If your friends are outside the Kentuckiana area, they can stream the show at the link below; go to www.frager.com. At the bottom of the home page, click on LIVE NOW!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 Richard Syrop is the author of  Effortless Savings: A Step-by-Step Guidebook to Saving Money Without Sacrifice

His web page is http://effortlesssavings.com/

Richard Syrop grew up in a family that viewed saving money as a passion, hobby, and lifestyle. Over the years, he has seen and personally tested just about every saving method imaginable. Dissatisfied with conventional ways to reduce expenditures, Richard developed a unique approach to savings, which does not require consumers to give up their favorite products, entertainment or travel. He has taught these saving methods in seminars throughout the Pacific Northwest.

Planned topics for discussion:

  1. How did you conceive the idea for this book?
  2. In your book, you discuss renegotiating Pay-TV and Internet rates. Will you tell our listeners how to do this?
  3. What is the best way to reduce cell phone bills?
  4. What is the easiest way to lower insurance premiums?
  5. What are some simple steps to reduce home energy consumption?
  6. Most money management books discourage the use of credit cards.
  7. However, you encourage it. Why?
  8. You strongly recommend consumers keep their money in a rewards checking account. Can you tell our listeners about this?
  9. In your book, you mentioned that you and your wife made over $1,000 last year by capitalizing on back account signup bonuses. Can you explain how you did this?
  10. You encourage consumers to never buy extended warranties for products or services. Isn’t this risky?
  11. In order to save money on eBay, you recommend using a sniping service to  place bids seconds before auctions end. Can you discuss this?

Related Topics:

Effortless Savings: Websites of the Month

Extended Warranties  (Wiki article)

How to Negotiate with Cable TV companies  (eHow page)

How to Negotiate Internet Service (eHow page)

Dr Stan Frager Show just went live

Watch it live
Couldn’t catch it in time? Check out the recorded videos on Dr Stan Frager Show.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

For more info stay in touch with “Let’s Talk” at these links:

Let’s talk blogposts http://t.co/u2aML1Dg
facebook http://www.facebook.com/stan.frager
twitter https://twitter.com/DrFragershow

Kate Chawansky / Dr. Stan Frager Show / Producer
Tony Safina (“ace” Media Researcher) tony@iglou.com

Pediatric DepressionDr. Deborah Serani and Dr. Patrick Possel

Please encourage your friends to tune in to WGTK 970 am. Also, encourage them to CALL!  the live chat line is (502) 571-0970. The show airs from 8:06 to 10pm Eastern Time. If your friends are outside the Kentuckiana area, they can stream the show at the link below; go to www.frager.com. At the bottom of the home page, click on LIVE NOW!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 Tonight’s guests are Dr. Deborah Serani and Dr. Patrick Possel

Dr. Deborah Serani is an expert in depression, specializing in its treatment and living successfully with the disorder since childhood. She is a licensed psychologist in practice twenty five years, an associate professor at Adelphi University, and author of the award-winning books Living with Depression and Depression and Your Child: A Guide for Parents and Caregivers.”    Webpage:  http://www.drdeborahserani.com/

Planned topics for discussion:

  • Talk to us about why depression is the most common of all mental illnesses.
  • What are the differences between boys and girls experiencing depression during puberty?
  • Why is suicide more common among the elderly than in any other age group?
  • What are some reasons why depressed people may be afraid to seek treatment?
  • What is depression?
  • Is there a difference between depression in children, adolescents, and adults?
  • Why is there this big increase in cases of depression in adolescence?
  • What’s the reason for the gender difference in depression starting in adolescence?
  • Why is depression in adolescents so important?
  • What are risk factors for depression?
  • How do I know that my child has depression?
  • What treatments for depression are effective for adolescents?
  • Can we prevent depression in adolescents?
  • What are the problems with prevention of depression? Are there possible solutions?
  • Is there anything that parents can do to prevent depression in their children?

Dr. Patrick Possel has worked for 15 years with children and adolescents. Besides working clinically with minors, he has implemented 4 large scale studies to prevention of depression with about 2500 students in America and Europe and 2 longitudinal studies with 1000+ participants to better understand the origins of depression.

Related Links:

Dr Deborah Serani  (Wikipedia article)

 Depression  (MedlinePlus references)

 

DEPRESSION STATISTICS EVERYONE SHOULD KNOW

General Statistics

  • Depression is the most common of all mental illnesses.
  • Depression affects 121 million people worldwide.
  • Depression can occur in anyone, regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, age or background.
  • 1 in 10 people in the US live with depression. That’s about 19 million people who experience depression a year… or about the entire population of the state of Florida.
  • Over 300,000 soldiers returning from active duty experience a depressive disorder.
  • #1 cause of disability in the United States, according to The World Health Organization, is depression.
  • 53% of people believe that depression is a sign of personal weakness.
  • 68% of Americans don’t want someone with depression marrying into their family.
  • 58% don’t want a person with depression in their workplaces.
  • 38% believe people with depression are dangerous.
  • Suicide is a significant risk for anyone with a mental illness, but is exponentially higher for people with depression.
  • 80% of depressed people are not currently receiving treatment.
  • Depression is a treatable condition, with 90% of those who DO seek treatment experiencing recovery.

Children and Depression

  • Up to 1 out of 40 babies has depression.
  • 4% of preschoolers has depression
  • 5% of school aged children have depression
  • 11% of adolescents have a depressive disorder by age 18.
  • Boys have higher rates of documented depression before puberty, whereas rates of depression increase for girls over boys during puberty.
  • Students with depression are twice as likely to drop out of school.

Elderly and Depression

  • Approximately 2% of people over age 65 living in the community (not living in nursing homes or other institutions) experience depression.
  • Suicide is more common among the elderly than in any other age group.
  • Recent NIMH studies show that 20% of older adults have subclinical symptoms that do not meet the diagnostic criteria for depression yet need increased health services.

Gender Differences

Women:

  •  15% of women experience postpartum depression.
  •  40% of women will not seek help for depression.
  •  Women internalize their depression, presenting with sadness and self-blame.

Men:

  •   7% of men experience depression. That’s over 6 million Americans.
  •   1 in 10 new fathers experience postpartum depression.
  •  50% of men will not seek help for depression.
  •  Men externalize when depressed, presenting with more irritability and anger.

References

Barney, L.J., Griffiths, K., Christensen, H. & Jorm, A. (2009) Exploring the nature of stigmatising beliefs about depression and help-seeking: Implications for reducing stigma. BMC Public Health, 9 (61): 1-11.

Bromet, E., Andrade, L. et al. (2011). Cross-national epidemiology of DSM-IV major depressive episode. BMC Medicine: 9(1): 90-101.

Dingenfelder, S. (2009). Stigma: Alive and well. Monitor on Psychology, 40(6), 56.

Eisenberg, D.; Goldstein, E. and Hunt, J. (2009). Mental health and academic success. B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, 9(1): 40-49.

Gotlib, I. A. and Hammen, C. L. (2010). Handbook of depression. New York: Guilford Press.

Griffiths, K.M., Nakane, Y. et. al (2006). Stigma in response to mental disorders: a comparison of Australia and Japan. BMC Psychiatry,6(21):1-21.

Kessler, R.C., Cox, B.J., et. al. (2011). The effects of latent variables in the development of comorbidity among common mental disorders. Depression and Anxiety 28(1), 29-39.

Luby, J., Si, X. Belden, A.C., Tandon, M. & Spitznagel, E. (2009). Preschool depression: Homotypic continuity and course over 24 months. Archives of General Psychiatry, 68(8):897-905.

Nock, M.K., Borges, G. & Ono, Y. (2012). Suicide: Global perspectives from the WHO World Mental Health Survey. New York: Cambridge University Press

Piccinello, M. & Wilkinson, G. (2000). Gender differences in depression. The British Journal of Psychiatry,177: 486-492,

World Health Organization (2011). Mental health atlas. Geneva: World Health Organization

 

Ten Myths about Pediatric Depression
By
Dr. Deborah Serani

1.    Myth: Babies and children cannot be diagnosed with depression.
False. Babies and children can be diagnosed with a mood disorder. Called Pediatric Depression, this major health concern reveals that 4% of preschool aged children, 5% of school-aged children and 11% percent of adolescents meet the criteria for major depression.

2.    Myth: My pediatrician says my child’s moodiness it just a phase – and not to worry.  
False. General practitioners and pediatricians, while trained in aspects of mental illness, are not specialists. If you’re on the receiving end of a don’t-worry-it’s-just-a-stage response from your family physician, seek a second opinion from a mental health specialist.

3.    Myth: Good parents can always detect if their child is depressed.
False. Most children who suffer with depression keep their thoughts and feelings masked. The only way for parents to understand depression is to be aware of the age specific behaviors and symptoms. Depression is not a result of bad parenting.

4.    Myth: Pediatric Depression will go away on its own.
False: A serious mental illness cannot be willed away or brushed aside with a change in attitude. Ignoring the problem doesn’t give it the slip either. Depression is serious, but treatable illness, with a success rates of upwards of 80% for children who receive intervention.
5.    Myth: Talking about depression gives kids ideas and makes things worse.
False. Talking about depression with your child actually helps to reduce symptoms. Support and encouragement through open communication are significantly meaningful. This lets your child know he’s not alone, is loved and cared for.

6.    Myth: The risk of suicide for children is greatly exaggerated.
False. Suicide is the 3rd leading cause of death in adolescents ages 15 to 24, and is the 6th leading cause of death in children ages 5 to14. Suicide is significantly linked to depression, so early diagnosis and treatment of pediatric depression are extremely important.

7.    Myth: Antidepressants will change your child’s personality.
False. Antidepressants normalize the ranges of moods in children who have a mood disorder – and will not change your child’s personality what-so-ever.

8.    Myth: Once a child starts taking antidepressants, he is on it for the rest of his life.
False. The majority of children who take antidepressant medication will stop their prescription in a careful and modified manner when recovery from depression occurs. This clinical state of recovery takes about a year or so to achieve.

9.    Myth: When a depressed child refuses help, there’s nothing parents can do.
False.  If your child refuses to go to talk therapy or take medication, there are things you can do. You can seek therapy with a trained mental health specialist to learn how to help your child in spite of the fact that he won’t attend sessions. In a crisis situation, you can drive your child to the nearest hospital emergency room, or contact family, friends or the local police for assistance in getting him there.

10.    Myth: Nowadays, stigma for children and teens living with depression has declined.
False. Though evidence-based research has shown depression is a real illness, stigma is on the rise instead of on the decline. There is so much shame regarding mental illness that statistics show only 1 in 5 actually seeks treatment. Studies have shown that knowledge of depression appears insufficient to dispel stigma. What does reduce stigma? Learning about positive and inspiring stories of people living successfully with depression.

Source

Serani, D. (2013). Depression and Your Child: A Guidebook for Parents and Caregivers. Lanham, Rowman & Littlefield.

 

Dr Stan Frager Show just went live

Watch it live
Couldn’t catch it in time? Check out the recorded videos on Dr Stan Frager Show.

Happy Father’s Day, Y’all!

The idea of Father’s Day was conceived slightly more than a century ago by Sonora Dodd of Spokane, Wash., while she listened to a Mother’s Day sermon in 1909. Dodd wanted a special day to honor her father, William Smart, a widowed Civil War veteran who was left to raise his six children on a farm. A day in June was chosen for the first Father’s Day celebration, June 17, 1910, proclaimed by Spokane’s mayor because it was the month of Smart’s birth. The first presidential proclamation honoring fathers was issued in 1966 when President Lyndon Johnson designated the third Sunday in June as Father’s Day. Father’s Day has been celebrated annually since 1972 when President Richard Nixon signed the public law that made it permanent.   More info:  Facts for Features: Father’s Day

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

For more info stay in touch with “Let’s Talk” at these links:

Let’s talk blogposts http://t.co/u2aML1Dg
facebook http://www.facebook.com/stan.frager
twitter https://twitter.com/DrFragershow

Kate Chawansky / Dr. Stan Frager Show / Producer
Tony Safina (“ace” Media Researcher) tony@iglou.com

 

Chronic Pain Mr. Thomas Thornberry and Dr. Erica Adams

Please encourage your friends to tune in to WGTK 970 am. Also, encourage them to CALL!  the live chat line is (502) 571-0970. The show airs from 8:06 to 10pm Eastern Time. If your friends are outside the Kentuckiana area, they can stream the show at the link below; go to www.frager.com. At the bottom of the home page, click on LIVE NOW!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 Tonight’s guests are Mr. Thomas Thornberry and Dr. Erica Adams

Website:  www.mentalmorsels.com

Thomas is a behavioral medicine specialist who earned his master’s
degree in clinical psychology at Morehead State University in 1997,
and a second master’s degree in public administration at Eastern
Kentucky University in 2013.  His professional interests are in health
and wellness practices, as well as the psychology of leisure.  Thomas
has worked extensively with medical patients, mostly those with
chronic pain, since 2001.  He currently provides pain-counseling
services at HealthPoint Associates.  He also writes a monthly magazine
column for Health Beat Magazine in Richmond, called Mental Morsels.

Planned topics of discussion:

  • Let’s start with defining the condition.  What do we mean when we say “chronic pain?”
  • Patients often say that their doctor has told them “you’ll just have to learn to live with the pain.”  Does that mean the patient is doomed to suffer the rest of his or her life?
  • Is it possible to die from pain?
  • Where do you think traditional medical practice has fallen the most short when it comes to helping people with pain?
  • What are some examples of “iatrogenesis,” of patients getting the wrong message from their doctor?
  • Are there people whose pain is “all in their heads?”
  • So is that why doctors refer patients to see counselors, when their problem is pain?
  • If a patient has had every medication imaginable and a ton of surgeries, how talking supposed to help?
  • How can anyone who doesn’t have pain possible understand what it’s like?
  • What kind of services can patients expect when they come to a behavioral medicine specialist?  What do you do with them?
  • How can spouses and families get involved in helping someone with pain?

Dr. Erica Adams

Dr. Erica Adams received her Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology from the University of Louisville. Currently, she works as a health and counseling psychologist with Bluegrass Health Psychology in Lexington, KY. She is pursuing board certification in Health Psychology, and her special interest areas include chronic pelvic pain and gastrointestinal disorders.

Planned topics of discussion:

  • 1. What role does a health psychologist play in helping someone with pain?
  • 2. Does a health psychologist work with the patient’s other providers?
  • 3. You mentioned ‘biofeedback.’ What is that?
  • 4. What are some of the other coping strategies you teach patients?
  • 5. What are some of the effects of living with chronic pain?
  • 6. I imagine it also affects one’s family. What do you know about this?
  • 7. What kind of chronic pain conditions do you commonly see?
  • 8. What are some tips you can provide our listeners who are living with chronic pain?
  • 9. Do you work with people who are interested in getting off of or reducing their use of narcotics/pain medications?
  • 10. What are some of the reasons people end up wanting to stop those medications?

Related Links:

American Chronic Pain Society

American Pain Society

Chronic Pain  (wiki article)

Facts and figures on Pain  (American Academy of Pain Medicine)

National Fibromyalgia & Chronic Pain Association

Pain Management  (wiki article)

Pain Management and Prescription Drugs  (useful info re undermedication in the USA)

Pelvic Pain  (wiki article)

Diversion of Pharmaceutical Drugs  (useful and interesting article)

Title 21 United States Code (USC) Controlled Substances Act

 

Dr Stan Frager Show just went live

Watch it live
Couldn’t catch it in time? Check out the recorded videos on Dr Stan Frager Show.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

For more info stay in touch with “Let’s Talk” at these links:

Let’s talk blogposts http://t.co/u2aML1Dg
facebook http://www.facebook.com/stan.frager
twitter https://twitter.com/DrFragershow

Kate Chawansky / Dr. Stan Frager Show / Producer
Tony Safina (“ace” Media Researcher) tony@iglou.com

Illness Anxiety Disorder Monnica T. Williams, Ph.D.

Please encourage your friends to tune in to WGTK 970 am. Also, encourage them to CALL!  the live chat line is (502) 571-0970. The show airs from 8:06 to 10pm Eastern Time. If your friends are outside the Kentuckiana area, they can stream the show at the link below; go to www.frager.com. At the bottom of the home page, click on LIVE NOW!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Tonight’s guest is Monnica T. Williams, Ph.D                       

Monnica T. Williams, Ph.D., is a clinical psychologist and Director of the Center for Mental Health Disparities at the University of Louisville in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. She completed her undergraduate studies at MIT and UCLA. She received her Doctoral Degree in clinical psychology from the University of Virginia.  Dr. Williams is currently a member of the International OCD Foundation (IOCDF), where she serves on the Scientific Advisory Board. She specializes in treatment of the most severe cases of OCD and related disorders.

Planned topics of discussion:

  • What is hypochondriasis?
  • What are the symptoms of hypochondriasis?
  • How common is hypochondriasis?
  • What is the public impact of hypochondriasis?
  • What is the relationship between hypochondriasis and health/illness anxiety?
  • What is the difference between hypochondriasis and OCD?
  • Are the symptoms just all in their head?
  • What causes hypochondriasis?
  • Can people with hypochondriasis have real medical problems?
  • What types of therapy are helpful for hypochondriasis?
  • What types of medications are helpful for hypochondriasis?

Related Links:

Culturally Speaking  (Dr. Williams’ blog)

Hypochondiasis  (article in Wikipedia)

Obsessive-Compulsive disorder  (article in Wikipedia)

 

Dr Stan Frager Show just went live

Watch it live
Couldn’t catch it in time? Check out the recorded videos on Dr Stan Frager Show.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

For more info stay in touch with “Let’s Talk” at these links:

Let’s talk blogposts http://t.co/u2aML1Dg
facebook http://www.facebook.com/stan.frager
twitter https://twitter.com/DrFragershow

Kate Chawansky / Dr. Stan Frager Show / Producer
Tony Safina (“ace” Media Researcher) tony@iglou.com

 

Media and Social Media Prof. David Levy and Ceradwen Bacon

Please encourage your friends to tune in to WGTK 970 am. Also, encourage them to CALL!  the live chat line is (502) 571-0970. The show airs from 8:06 to 10pm Eastern Time. If your friends are outside the Kentuckiana area, they can stream the show at the link below; go to www.frager.com. At the bottom of the home page, click on LIVE NOW!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Tonight’s guests are Professor David Levy from the University of Washington with his student Ceradwen Bacon.

David Levy is a professor in the Information School at the University of Washington. He earned a Ph.D. in computer science at Stanford University and a diploma in Calligraphy and Bookbinding from the Roehampton Institute in London. For over 15 years he was a researcher at the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, exploring the transition from paper and print to digital media. At the University of Washington since 2000, he focuses on bringing mindfulness training and other contemplative practices to address problems of information overload and acceleration.

Ceradwen Bacon is from San Juan Island in Washington and has a background in design, art history and psychology.  She is currently living in Seattle working on her Masters in Library and Information Science.  Ms. Bacon works at a small, non-profit university library, helping faculty and students use technology in the classroom.

Planned topics for discussion:

  • How long have you been teaching at the University of Washington?
  • Talk about your class “Information and Contemplation?”
  • Why do you choose to begin each class with 15 minutes of meditation?
  • Do you feel that meditation should be a vital part of everyone’s ritual?
  • What is mono-tasking?
  • Why does society choose mobile communication rather than face-to-face communication?
  • Do you feel texting has a negative impact on daily tasks, such as driving, studying, etc.
  • What do you believe is the big reason so many people are more or less dependent on technology?
  • What are the risks of taking breaks from technology in today’s world?
  • Tell us more about the American culture of feeling the need to work 24/7 and how technology makes that a near reality.
  • Does the ability to have information at your fingertips instantly outweigh the drawbacks of missing out on things like conversation?
  • How have smartphones affected our dependency on technology and the Internet?
  • Do you think that companies should follow France’s lead and cut back on distractions with mandatory technology breaks?
  • How harmful could constantly being involved with technology be on family life?

Related Links:

Information and Contemplation – Teaching Students How to Unplug  (article in USA Today)

Monotasking   (definition in The Urban Dictionary)

How to Meditate  (an entry in WikiHow)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

For more info stay in touch with “Let’s Talk” at these links:

Let’s talk blogposts http://t.co/u2aML1Dg
facebook http://www.facebook.com/stan.frager
twitter https://twitter.com/DrFragershow

Kate Chawansky / Dr. Stan Frager Show / Producer
Tony Safina (“ace” Media Researcher) tony@iglou.com

Law Enforcement w/Mr. Zach Fortier, Major Kelly Jones, Ms. Regan Jones, and Dr. Eli Karem

Please encourage your friends to tune in to WGTK 970 am. Also, encourage them to CALL!  the live chat line is (502) 571-0970. The show airs from 8:06 to 10pm Eastern Time. If your friends are outside the Kentuckiana area, they can stream the show at the link below; go to www.frager.com. At the bottom of the home page, click on LIVE NOW!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Tonight’s guests are Mr. Zach Fortier, Major Kelly Jones, Regan Jones, and Dr. Eli Karem.

Book website: CurbChek

Mr. Zach Fortier began his career with six years in the Air Force as an MP and did a tour in Saudi Arabia.  He completed the majority of his work in Odgen, Utah.  Mr. Fortier was a police officer for over 30 years, specializing in K-9, SWAT, gang, domestic violence, and sex crimes as an investigator.  He also suffers from PTSD as a result of the stressors of work.

Major Kelly Jones is currently assigned as the Commander of the Special Operations Division. There are 14 units under his command, including units such as SWAT, HNT, K-9, Air Unit, Bomb Squad, River Patrol Special Events and the LMPD Traffic Unit.  In 1987, he began his career in law enforcement with the former Louisville Division of Police (LPD). As a Major, Jones commanded the Third Division before taking over Special Operations.

Eli Karam, Ph.D., LMFT is a clinician specializing in couple and family therapy and maintains a private practice in Louisville, KY. Eli is currently the President for the Kentucky Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (KAMFT) and an Assistant Professor in the Family Therapy Program in the Kent School of Social Work at the University of Louisville. There he conducts research on couple and family relationships, teaches and supervises therapists-in-training. Dr. Eli also educates the public through various television and radio appearances.

Planned topics for discussion:

  • How are today’s cops different from when you started 30 years ago?
  • What are the changes you have seen in police work in the past 30 years? What would you like to see changed?
  • How has working as a cop changed your perspective on crime?  How about courts and prisons?
  • Should there be hasher penalties in the justice system?
  • How did you and your colleagues deal with the everyday stress of the job?
  • Is there anything not being taught in law enforcement academics that you feel should be mandatory?
  • What are your views about police brutality?  Do you think it is ever warranted?
  • What is your perspective on what can be done to turn kids away from the gang lifestyle?
  • What is your opinion about the school shootings, and now stabbings, both in primary and higher learning institutions?
  • What do you think we should do to deal with these shootings?
  • Are there any cases that stick out in your mind more than others?
  • Why did you not want recognition for meritorious acts while on the force?
  • What did you consider a “good day” on shift?
  • Your next book in the works is about the original founder of the Crips gang in Los Angeles.  What can you tell me about that?

Related topics:

Law enforcement in the United States  (Wikipedia article)

Crime in the United States  (Wikipedia article)

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder  (Medline plus article and links)

Happy Mother’s Day!!!  ‘Hope it  was a good one!!!

Some lovely quotes about moms.  From the QuoteGarden.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

For more info stay in touch with “Let’s Talk” at these links:

Let’s talk blogposts http://t.co/u2aML1Dg
facebook http://www.facebook.com/stan.frager
twitter https://twitter.com/DrFragershow

Kate Chawansky / Dr. Stan Frager Show / Producer
Tony Safina (“ace” Media Researcher) tony@iglou.com

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Dr. Janet Dean

Please encourage your friends to tune in to WGTK 970 am. Also, encourage them to CALL!  the live chat line is (502) 571-0970. The show airs from 8:06 to 10pm Eastern Time. If your friends are outside the Kentuckiana area, they can stream the show at the link below; go to www.frager.com. At the bottom of the home page, click on LIVE NOW!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Tonight’s guest is Dr. Janet Dean

www.asbury.edu/academics/departments/behavioral-sciences/overview

Dr. Janet Dean is a licensed psychologist and assistant professor at Asbury University in Wilmore, Kentucky.  Prior to moving into a faculty role, she worked in a variety of clinical settings, from college counseling to community mental health and forensic assessment.  Her interest in PTSD among veterans began when her own husband served as a Navy chaplain in Iraq in 2005 and has since grown as she has worked with more and more veterans.

Planned topics for discussion:

  • What is PTSD?  What are its symptoms?
  • What is combat/operational stress, and how is it related to PTSD?
  • Some veterans develop PTSD; some don’t.  Who is likely to develop PTSD?
  • What kind of traumatic events do people have to experience for PTSD to develop?
  • How common is PTSD in our veterans?  Why do so many veterans show signs of PTSD?
  • How does experiencing war affect people and their beliefs about the world, others, and themselves?
  • Some veterans are said to have survivor’s guilt?  What is that?
  • Are the high rates of suicide related to PTSD in our veterans? How?
  • How do veterans “come back home” and transition to civilian life?
  • What are some problematic things that veterans do to self-medicate?
  • How does PTSD affect a veteran’s marriage and family?  As a spouse, how do you deal with your loved one’s PTSD?
  • How does PTSD affect a veteran and his/her work/career?
  • How do co-occurring medical issues affect PTSD and the healing process?
  • What are some things that a veteran can do to help him/herself?
  • When should a veteran get help?   How would they know that their symptoms have become a problem?
  • What kind of help is available for veterans struggling with PTSD?
  • Why do so many veterans avoid getting help?
  • We hear stories of veterans who come home and beat their spouses or children or who act out in other violent ways.  Where does this aggression come from?
  • Talk about the similarities and differences between active duty military and reservists and how these might affect stress-related symptoms in them.

Related topics:

Make the Connection / PTSD  (Shared experiences and support for Veterans)

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder  (Medline plus article and links)

PTSD: Posttraumatic Stress Disorder  (U.S. Dept. of Veterans Affairs)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

For more info stay in touch with “Let’s Talk” at these links:

Let’s talk blogposts http://t.co/u2aML1Dg
facebook http://www.facebook.com/stan.frager
twitter https://twitter.com/DrFragershow

Kate Chawansky / Dr. Stan Frager Show / Producer
Tony Safina (Media Research) tony@iglou.com

The Lie Guy® Stan B. Walters

Please encourage your friends to tune in to WGTK 970 am. Also, encourage them to CALL! the live chat line is (502) 571-0970. The show airs from 8:06 to 10pm Eastern Time. If your friends are outside the Kentuckiana area, they can stream the show at the link below; go to www.frager.com. At the bottom of the home page, click on LIVE NOW!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Tonight’s guest:

Stan Walters “The Lie Guy”
Webpage:  www.TheLieGuy.com

Stan B. Walters is know as “The Lie Guy®.”  He is president of Truth and Deception, Inc.  He creates Innovative Interview and Interrogation Techniques and Training for Interrogators world -wide.  He is author of several books on deception including “The Truth About Lying: How to Spot a Lie and Protect Yourself From Deception” which has now been translated into 7 languages.

Topics we expect to cover:

  • Why do we miss the lies people tell us?
  • Doesn’t everybody do some form of lying?
  • Are there different forms of deception?
  • What causes people to lie?
  • Is it possible to tell a lie so much that you can believe it?
  • Tell us about the work you do with the military, law enforcement, private corporations and intelligence agencies.
  • Are there any fool-proof ways to spot the signs of deception?
  • How do we deal with people who lie to us often?
  • Can we do better at spotting deception?
  • What are some of the myths about the human signs of deception?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

For more info stay in touch with “Let’s Talk” at these links:

Let’s talk blogposts http://t.co/u2aML1Dg
facebook http://www.facebook.com/stan.frager
twitter https://twitter.com/DrFragershow

Kate Chawansky / Dr. Stan Frager Show / Producer
Tony Safina (Media Researcher) tony@iglou.com

Sexual Assault in the Military Ms. Lindsey Gargotto & Ms. Michele Varner

Please encourage your friends to tune in to WGTK 970 am. Also, encourage them to CALL! the live chat line is (502) 571-0970. The show airs from 8:06 to 10pm Eastern Time. If your friends are outside the Kentuckiana area, they can stream the show at the link below; go to www.frager.com. At the bottom of the home page, click on LIVE NOW!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Tonight on the Dr Stan Frager Show, Dr Frager will be interviewing Ms. Lindsey Gargotto and Ms. Michele Varner about sexual assault in the military.  You will learn the difference between military assault and civilian assault and how the VA is involved with these crimes.  It all starts at 8 PM; listen in.

Lindsay Gargotto is the founder and CEO of Athena’s Sisters, a grassroots organization run by and for military women for mind, heart, and body justice. She is an Air Force veteran, mother of two girls. She has MSW and MFA in Creative Writing.

Michele Varner is the Board President of Athena’s Sisters. She has an MSW and is the business owner of Two Smart Girls. Michele is a Navy veteran and the mother of two boys.

 topics for interview:

  • What is MST?
  • How is different from civilian definitions of sexual assault?
  • How do you go about reporting barriers?
  • What are the Athena Sisters?  How did you begin and what kind of work are you involved in?
  • What kinds of different approaches of therapy and community based services do you offer?
  • How do you monitor the overuse of anti-depressants as the typical healing practice?
  • Tell us about the masculine environment of the VA that deters women from seeking services
  • Recognizing the VA cannot be held responsible for all the systemic issues – that this is about about our community

Related Links:

Military Sexual Trauma (MST)  -  Wikipedia article

Sexual Assault in the U.S. Military  -  Wikipedia article

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder  -  Wikipedia article

Athena’s Sisters http://www.athenassisters.org

Two Smart Girls  https://www.facebook.com/TwoSmartGirls
Call 502-876-0515 to schedule your spring cleaning today!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

For more info stay in touch with “Let’s Talk” at these links:

Let’s talk blogposts http://t.co/u2aML1Dg
facebook http://www.facebook.com/stan.frager
twitter https://twitter.com/DrFragershow

Kate Chawansky / Dr. Stan Frager Show / Producer
Tony Safina (Media Researcher) tony@iglou.com

What is Integrative Medicine? Dr. Paul Constante

Please encourage your friends to tune in to WGTK 970 am. Also, encourage them to CALL! the live chat line is (502) 571-0970. The show airs from 8:06 to 10pm Eastern Time. If your friends are outside the Kentuckiana area, they can stream the show at the link below; go to www.frager.com. At the bottom of the home page, click on LIVE NOW!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Tonight’s guests:

Dr. Paul Constante       
Website: http://dynamicmedrehab.com/about-us/     

Dr. Paul Constante graduated from Life University in Georgia and opened his first office in Mexico where he practiced for 8 years.  Dr. Constante suffered a broken neck due to a serious skiing accident and now integrates neurology with a progressive chiropractic and rehabilitation therapy to provide the most forward-thinking, advanced treatments available in Louisville.

Topics tonight -

  • What is integrative medicine?
  • How does the medical practice and Chiropractors work together?
  • How does this benefit the patient?
  • How does rehab fit into the plan?
  • What types of conditions are treated at Dynamic?
  • What is laser therapy?
  • Explain how your weight loss program works.
  • What conditions are commonly treated at your clinic?
  • Does insurance cover treatments?
  • How does spinal decompression work and what is it for?
  • What is your neuropathy program and what is your success rate?  (85% improvement average)
  • Do you treat osteoarthritis of the knee and how?

Related Links:

Chiropractic Medicine  (links and info from Medline Plus)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

For more info stay in touch with “Let’s Talk” at these links:

Let’s talk blogposts http://t.co/u2aML1Dg
facebook http://www.facebook.com/stan.frager
twitter https://twitter.com/DrFragershow

Kate Chawansky / Dr. Stan Frager Show / Producer
Tony Safina (Media Researcher) tony@iglou.com